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20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> this isn't about terrorism. these are regular law enforcement investigations, and this is, this is, investigating people's communications. these are, who they talked to. who they e-mailed. who they engage in online conversations with, their friends, family, colleagues and loved once. >> reporter: here are some facts gathered by the aclu from justice department document. between 2009 and 2011 the number of orders for surveillance went up 60%. e-mails and network data, while smaller in number, increased by 361%. this type of information used to be gathered from devices attached right to the telephone but now, it can easily be retrieved by the phone company internally. aclu says it is done without a judge considering merits of the case. but the department of justice fired back saying in a statement, in every instance cited here the federal judge authorized law enforcement activity as criminals increasingly use new and sophisticated technologies use of orders used by a judge and strictly authorized by congress is essential for law enforcement to carry out its duty and to protect the pu
state courts could negate some of the new laws that are intended to require photo i.d.s for voters? >> the first observation is in terms of that case in maryland, that was one misguided example where it never should have happened, the race wasn't that close, so it was a huge mistake by that individual and he paid for it with time in prison. in terms of your concern about voter i.d., and having to show i.d., i live in virginia i just got my voter card. they allow anything like a utility bill or anything like that. it's a lot easier to go vote in america than get on an airplane. so if you're worried about fraud, i think these are reasonable requirements. >> i guess in terms of polling, to the extent that our firms can, we try to poll off a registered voter list so they are registered voters who presumably have -- and in elections we try to sample people who not only register but have voted in past elections. >> but this year the requirements for voting are not going to be just that you register, they're going to be that you have a voter i.d. how do you account for that? >> we ask the
're looking at is a more diverse group of people in terms of education, business, law, even humanity, to some extent. we are looking at a broader generations. we are looking at people, we were talking about xi. he has some enormous experience, my those leaders from all over the world visiting his city. i think we are looking at people experienced in the world. when we look back in history, i expect we will say there was a surge of reform in 1992 after tiananmen. that china was pushed into the world, wto, explosive growth. we will look at hu jintao as a time of consolidation and i look to the next group to push and tackle for the first time the political question. because china's society has changed. it has less dominant leaders. it has a more pluralized society. and has resources scattered among social organizations, corporations that have their own independent power. i think we are going to see a new push. i do not know how vigorous but in the political direction, we will have more cosmopolitan leaders compared to the past. >> for someone to rise to the top of the chinese hierarchy, would gi
laws, the ban on the xl pipeline, the enforcement of labor laws -- those policies have killed thousands and thousands of jobs and collectively, we are making it incredibly difficult for small businesses to drive, much less -- thrive, much less survive. >> so if you have 65% of spending going to individual payments, what would you do to try to reduce that? >> in order to create more jobs, we have to control the national debt. i think that is what we have to do. i have said it from the beginning. i have given a plan to try to deal with it. this idea that somehow mr. cruz is lecturing us on standing on our own feet, i find incredible. he spent most of your adult life working for the government. you have not created jobs. you have not on your own business. i have. my wife and i own a retail store. we did not have the federal government with their boots on our neck. when george bush was president, we lost 700,000 jobs per month. all these programs were in place at the time. the only addition is the health care act, which has not been fully implemented. i think that you have a selective memor
of six best legislators. every single law was passed in a bipartisan manner, with a republican governor, republican senate, democratic house. i have always worked together in a bipartisan manner. that is the value of my record. when you are looking at these two candidates, this is a person who has never been elected to anything. mr. cruz. i have a record you can look at. bipartisan record that you can look at. >> this election is a clear choice between the obama democrats, more spending, more debt, more government control, and going back to our founding freedoms. >> we need to get out of here. because we are out of time. thank you as always. >> thank you and thank you to both candidates. we want to leave you with a final note -- early voting begins oct. 22. just three weeks from now. the election is november 6. that does it for the belo debate from victory park in dallas. for all of us, have a good night, everybody. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> see the debate tomorrow night, and watch and engage. comi
law reviews and look at what is being written. i look at some of the legal blogs on a pretty routine basis. pretty much every day, i will look at scotus blog, supreme court of the united states. or there is a blog called "how appealing." there are a variety of blogs, written by law professors. some are more conservative and some are more liberal. i will look at those every once in awhile and see what people are saying and thinking and writing about legal issues. i find them interesting and occasionally useful. you know. it is the world i come from, as you know. i am not going to say, i am never going to read the law review article again. >> do you read them before, as you are trying to sort through cases? >> usually only when the briefs point them out. i rarely do an independent search. >> you talked about the role of clerks in sorting through the cert petitions. in recent years, the court has taken many fewer cases than it did in an earlier area. -- earlier era. maybe there are fewer circuits and fewer important issues, but that seems unlikely. do you have a sense of whether the cou
of the obstacles that she face. more women than men are in law school and medical school now. and so, when elizabeth dole would describe how she was one of 24 women at harvard law school, is really an older notion at this point. if you get distances her from the younger audience is. so i don't think it's a good idea for modern women candidate to keep describing the obstacles they face and how unique they are because we tend to resist voting for someone who was the first of anything because it seems scary and probably not a good idea because it's never done it before. so i think taking attention away from that is better. >> and not labeling issues as women's issues are feminist issues. i think all the women in the book really didn't run as women. there's a book called running as a woman. but when pat schroeder ran the first time for congress on colorado, someone asked her to come her to come into play and is running as a woman? her question was, do i have another option? [laughter] it is obvious this is a woman. it's obviously never had a woman president. so i don't think you need to make a
's their licensing laws. >> bill: let's get back to campus. if you're dating somebody on the campus, then you can't suggest that intimacy should happen? >> you can't implicitly or explicitly ask someone for sex. which raises the question, how do you get there? >> bill: are you going to answer the question? >> i don't know. i think if you have sex, it must be rape since you weren't allowed to -- >> bill: you can't overtly ask or even like -- how about a little wink? can you do that? >> apparently. >> bill: you can wink or you can't? 'cause that may be implicity, if i do that, i could be implying something. >> i'm sure totalitarian left would have an opinion because you would have to go before one of their tribunals. the truth is that they were -- >> bill: they have tribunals there? >> they rarely punish people for these things. but when you have all these rules and they have a civility code which would ban you, what it means is they use them to punish people they don't like and those are usually people like you. >> bill: tell me about the civility code at the university of north carolina. >> all s
lawsuits pending that could negate some of the new laws that are intended to require photo ids for voters? >> first observation is, in terms of the case in maryland, that was one misguided example. never should have happened. the race was not that close. it was a huge mistake by that individual and he paid for it with a time in prison. in terms of your concerns about voter i.d., and having to show id, i live in virginia and just got my voter card. they allow any kind of thing, a utility bill, or anything like that. it is a lot easier to vote then to get on an airplane. if you are worried about fraud, i think that these are reasonable requirements. >> in terms of polling, to the extent that both firms can, we try to pull a registered voter list. registered voters who have presumably -- i mean, we try to sample who have not only registered -- people who have not only registered but voted in the last election. >> in a lot of states, they have to have a photo id. how do you account for that? >> our callers asked you to show them your folder id -- your photo i.d. >> not a lot that you can do.
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)